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YieldEDGE Technology

At Landmark, we know that getting the most from every acre is your top priority.  That is why we have invested in the technology and the people to help our growers maximize yields, increase efficiency, create sustainability and of course, add profit to the bottom line.

Landmark’s YieldEDGE solutions takes precision ag technology to the next level.  By continually building on the basics of precision ag that we have employed for over 20 years, we have created the foundation for continued success for our members.  We focus our efforts on three core principles:

  • Profitability:  As in any business, your bottom line is the driver that keeps the rest of your farm running.  Landmark’s YieldEDGE team works side-by-side with you to ensure that each dollar spent on your land is an investment in your future and your bank account.
  • Efficiency:  Time is money and today’s grower never has enough of it.  Landmark’s YieldEDGE solutions are created with increasing efficiency…make sure your time is well spent.
  • Sustainability:  We all want to leave the land better than we found it.  YieldEDGE’s computer-aided placement of seed, nutrients and ag chemicals ensures that as little as possible goes to waste and that future generations will be able to enjoy the land for years to come.

 

Access your YieldEDGE Viewer Account below.

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2015 Landmark Seed Guide

Our 2015 seed guide is now available!

View our digital seed guide

 

Curry_R_Logo_09_2

Curry Seed gives you choices, genetic diversity, and access to over 90% of the world’s best germplasm.  Landmark is excited to offer this genetic diversity!

Curry Seed Introduction

Curry 822-63 Corn

Curry 920-79 Corn

 

Joe Speich, Landmark Agronomist, offers insight on choosing your 2015 seed offers insight on choosing your 2015 seed

AsgrowCroplan by WF 3CDekalbMycogenNK
Asgrow 2031
Soybean
Croplan 2124
Soybean
Dekalb 5230
Corn
Mycogen F2F627
Corn Silage
NK 19Z9
Soybean
Asgrow 2433
Soybean
Croplan 2263
Soybean
Dekalb 53-56
Corn
Mycogen TMF720
Corn Silage
NK 20T6
Soybean
Croplan 4099
Corn
Dekalb 5520
Corn
Croplan 5415
Corn
Dekalb 57-75
Corn
Croplan 5875
Corn
Croplan 5887
Corn
Croplan 5146
Corn

 

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Landmark Services Cooperative broadens seed portfolio through Curry® Seeds partnership


New partnership offers Midwest crop growers additional benefits in plant diversity, insect protection and herbicide resistance

Landmark Services Cooperative is proud to announce a new partnership with Curry® Seeds. This new agreement broadens Landmark’s seed portfolio, offering growers additional benefits in plant diversity, insect protection and herbicide resistance.

“We are excited to bring new seed varieties and options to Landmark growers through this new partnership,” says Randy Bump, senior seed advisor for Landmark Services Cooperative. “Much like Landmark, Curry® Seeds provides local solutions through globally-recognized technology and tools. Through this new partnership, our members will have access to the most diverse seed portfolio in our region.”

Four new seed trait packages will compliment Landmark’s long-standing lineup of seeds in 2015. These new seed trait packages have different base germplasm than other seed available in southern Wisconsin and northern Illinois, giving growers additional options for reducing risk and reaching 300 bushels per year.

New seeds added to Landmark’s seed offerings, exclusively carried by Landmark, include the AcreMax® line of hybrid corn and soybean varieties 1225TM and 1252TM. These seeds were created from unique genetics and were specially selected to thrive in the 95-109 day growing seasons of southern Wisconsin and northern Illinois.

“Planting a diverse variety of seeds is important to prevent putting all your eggs in one basket,” says Joe Slosarczyk, agronomist and certified crop advisor with Landmark Services Cooperative. “When selecting seeds, look for a diverse portfolio that gives you options in genetics, traits and germplasm base. With our new partnership, Landmark Services Cooperative has the most diverse portfolio in our trade territory.”

The new seeds available through Landmark’s partnership with Curry® Seeds join the long-standing lineup of seed available from Landmark Services Cooperative which now includes seed varieties from: DeKalb, Asgrow, Mycogen, Croplan and NK.

To learn more about Landmark Services Cooperative’s 2015 seed portfolio, contact Joe Slosarczyk at 608-669-0896 or Joseph.Slosarczyk@landmark.coop, Randy Bump at 815-291-8920 or Randy.Bump@landmark.coop or visit www.landmark.coop.

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Landmark Services Cooperative Focuses on Safety: Anhydrous Ammonia

Landmark Services Cooperative focuses on farm safety.

It won’t be long now before nurse tanks will be seen throughout the countryside in preparation for the much anticipated spring season. With that comes that application of anhydrous ammonia. When handled, transported and applied properly, anhydrous can be a very efficient and effective fertilizer.

Your safety and security is important to the team at Landmark Services Cooperative. Matt Solymossy, Landmark’s safety manager has a few tips to help keep you safe and ensure success when using anhydrous ammonia.

General Anhydrous Information

  • Anhydrous is not a poison, but it is very corrosive to human tissue and internal organs.
  • It is colorless in both its liquid and gaseous forms.
  • When released from its container, anhydrous expands to 850 times its liquid volume.

Anhydrous Transportation Information

  • As classified by the U.S. Department of Transportation, anhydrous is a regulated hazardous material and is classified as a “non-flammable gas.”
  • All anhydrous nurse tanks must be marked with a slow moving vehicle sign.
  • When pulling nurse tanks, drivers need to keep as far as safely possible to the right of the road. It is legal to drive on the shoulder, but extreme caution should be used to not get close to ditches.
  • Tires on anhydrous nurse tanks are designed for use in fields, not on paved roads. Drive slowly, as the tires are only rated for 25 mph.
  • Avoid pulling anhydrous tanks at night, but if you must, use your vehicle flashers. State law in Illinois requires that nurse tanks pulled at night have an amber rotating or flashing light.
  • Use the safety chains when transporting anhydrous ammonia.
  • The most common transportation incident with nurse tanks are tank rollovers. Remember that you are transporting a liquid in the tank, which slushes around and redistributes weight. Go slowly while making turns and taking sharp corners.

Anhydrous Application Safety

  • Ensure hoses and quick couplers are in good working order and not passed their expiration date.
  • Use the safety chains when pulling ammonia with applicators and toolbars.
  • Always wear gloves and goggles when making and/or breaking hose connections, in addition to when opening valves.
  • Make sure to bleed out all lines prior to removing hose connections.

Landmark Services Cooperative is committed to your safety and profitability. If you have questions or concerns about anhydrous ammonia, please contact Landmark’s safety manager, Matt Solymossy at 608.819.3164 or matt.solymossy@landmark.coop.

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Learn More About Landmark’s New Curry ® Seed

Yield is not about LUCK.  It’s about YieldEDGE technology and it happens on purpose.  Our 2014 Curry Seed Trial Results proved that this new seed is OUTSTANDING and OUTPERFORMING.  To learn more, view our Top Secret InnovationEDGE Test Plot Results!

Landmark is excited to offer four new seed trait packages to their long-standing lineup of seeds in 2015. These new seed trait packages have different base germplasm than other seed available in southern Wisconsin and northern Illinois, giving growers additional options for reducing risk and reaching 300 bushels per year.

“Planting a diverse variety of seeds is important to prevent putting all your eggs in one basket,” says Joe Slosarczyk, agronomist and certified crop advisor with Landmark Services Cooperative. “When selecting seeds, look for a diverse portfolio that gives you options in genetics, traits and germplasm base. With our new partnership, Landmark Services Cooperative has the most diverse portfolio in our trade territory.”

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Agronomist Joe Slosarczyk discusses “Driving your success: Preparing for a successful growing season”

LSC AV Hay Forage Preparing

It’s been said that success doesn’t happen by accident. Like most achievements, a successful growing season is a result of proper planning, thoughtful determination and teamwork. For crop growers, equipment maintenance and field management are two drivers of this success.That’s according to Joe Slosarczyk, agronomist and certified crop advisor with Landmark Services Cooperative based in Cottage Grove. In his role with Landmark Services Cooperative, Slosarczyk works with Wisconsin and Illinois crop producers throughout the year to achieve optimal yields and an increased bottom line.”A successful growing season begins long before you bring out the planter, baler or chopper for harvest,” he says. “Success starts with a plan. Having that plan in place before the season starts can help producers to best manage risk and work towards achieving their end goals.””Creating a plan for the season also helps producers to react to any sort of adversity that is thrown their way,” Slosarczyk adds. “If changes need to be made on the fly, having a plan allows them to have a clearer focus to make the necessary changes.”

Common adjustments that Slosarczyk has seen Landmark growers need to make throughout the growing season include equipment maintenance and upgrades, field and crop rotations and agronomic management decisions. He tells producers that a thought-out plan is easier to adjust than reacting to a problem during the busy planting or harvest seasons.

Field planning

Slosarczyk encourages producers he works with to evaluate the yields of previous years, current feed inventories and market conditions and then to map out which crops will be planted in which fields.

This strategy will help producers to create crop rotations, schedule when planting, fertilizing and harvesting should ideally occur and set financial goals for the season. Having a bottom line objective and a strategic plan can help producers be prepared for seasonal or regional adversity.

“Working with an agronomist to develop a customized seed placement plan will help growers get a jumpstart on maximizing their crops yield potential,” he says, explaining that the customized seed placement plan should include proper hybrid placement, variety placement and planting populations.

After working with an agronomist to determine a long-term crop rotation schedule, changes may still need to be made based on environmental conditions.

So far in 2013, Slosarczyk says that some crop growers in southern Wisconsin have overcome the challenges of this year’s winter by adjusting their cropping strategies. With winter wheat and alfalfa kill-offs caused by a harsh winter following last year’s drought, some producers are switching fields to higher levels of forages to make-up for the lost winter crops and to rebuild feed inventories.

Equipment preparation

Beyond field planning, Slosarczyk says a key to a successful planting, growing and harvest season is to be sure field equipment is in high-quality shape before it hits the field.

“It’s easier to inspect equipment prior to the planting season rush,” he reminds. “We can come up with the best possible plan for success for the cropping season, but if the equipment isn’t able to do its job we have already set our end goals back.”

Slosarczyk says that the planter is the most important piece of equipment for overall crop success. He encourages growers to test planting meters and the overall function of the machine before planting season. Proper planting speeds also help to ensure proper stand establishment while a proper starter nutrition program can bring a producer’s yield potential to the next level.

Encouraging plant growth

Slosarczyk also advises producers to plan their additive programs for each field in early spring. Insecticides, herbicides, fungicides and inoculants may be useful tools based on past field performance and harvest goals.

Slosarczyk says that with proper management, fungicides have the ability to help growers produce higher amounts of high-quality feed.

“Fungicides can help corn and alfalfa crops to fight off possible problems through the summer, but they also have the ability to enhance the health of an alfalfa stand going into the winter, which can give that stand a better chance of withstanding the stresses of our northern temperatures,” he says.

Producers can work with an agronomist to determine which products will have the biggest impact on crop growth and success. Slosarczyk has found that a blanket approach is not often the best answer for the use of these products.

“Each year is different and good integrated management decisions need to be made for that individual’s specific cropping system,” he says. “If the possible scenarios are discussed before the season starts, both the grower and their agronomy or nutrition team have a high level of understanding as it pertains to meeting the business’ expectations.”

“Once you have your plan in place, the next step is to make sure you have a good scouting plan for the growing season to watch for pest, weed, disease or growth issues,” he recommends. “That way, when issues do arise, we can work together to find an effective and efficient resolution. After all, planning for success is no accident, but it sure can help prevent one.”

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Landmark awards 16 scholarships to area students

Cottage Grove, Wis. [January 8, 2015] – Landmark Services Cooperative announces its 2014 scholarship recipients. The cooperative recently awarded sixteen scholarships to a group of high school seniors and collegiate students pursuing postsecondary education.

Receiving an award of $750 each, this year’s scholarship recipients are as follows: Roger Becker, Pardeeville, Wis.; Chad Bruss, Markesan, Wis.; Anna Marie Condon, Horicon, Wis.; Matthew Cropp, Janesville, Wis.; Cordt Esser, Bloomington, Wis.; Emily Hefty, Mt. Horeb, Wis.; Andrew Ihm, Cassville, Wis.; Kyle Jahnke, Markesan, Wis.; Corban Koster, Burlington, Wis.; Cassandra Rose McGuire, Brodhead, Wis.; Riley Miller, Orfordville, Wis.; Nathaniel Nolden, Lodi, Wis.; Justine Romich, New Glarus, Wis.; Austin Wenck, East Troy, Wis.; and Nathan Zimdars, Ripon, Wis.

“These scholarship recipients represent a strong future for agriculture and rural America,” notes Bob Carlson, president and CEO of Landmark Services Cooperative. “Landmark has a commitment to building a strong future for our members and our communities, both through our team of experts and our community involvement. Our scholarship program helps us invest in our future by supporting education and programs connected to agriculture and rural America.”

Scholarships were awarded during Landmark Services Cooperative’s annual scholarship recipient luncheon on Jan. 6 at The Oak Grove’s Golf Course in Cottage Grove, Wis.

Recipients were selected from a pool of applicants based on: cumulative grade point average, leadership, scholastic achievement, extracurricular activities, personal motivation and academic and career goals. All members of Landmark Services Cooperative and their children attending four-year universities, two-year technical programs or short courses and high school seniors planning for postsecondary education were eligible to apply for the awards.

As part of the Landmark Gives Back program, Landmark has awarded more than $181,000 in scholarships throughout the Landmark Services Cooperative trade territory in southern Wisconsin and northern Illinois since the program’s inception in 1989.

Landmark Services Cooperative awarded postsecondary education scholarships to 16 Midwest students on January 6 in Cottage Grove, Wis. Scholarship recipients are pictured as follows: Front row, from left to right: Riley Miller, Orfordville, Wis.; Cassandra Rose McGuire, Brodhead, Wis.; Kendra Minick, Columbus, Wis.; Andrew Ihm, Platteville, Wis.; Back row, from left to right: Kyle Jahnke, Markesan, Wis.; Nathan Zimdars, Ripon, Wis.; Chad Bruss, Markesan, Wis.; Matthew Cropp, Janesville, Wis.; Austin Wenck, East Troy, Wis.; Roger Becker, Pardeeville, Wis. Not pictured is Anna Marie Condon, Horicon, Wis.; Cordt Esser, Bloomington, Wis.; Emily Hefty, Mt. Horeb, Wis.; Corban Koster, Burlington, Wis.; Nathaniel Nolden, Lodi, Wis.; and Justine Romich, New Glarus, Wis.

Posted in Landmark News