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Turning Point

From seed to feed, we are your partner in performance.  ProfitEDGE provides integrated solutions to keep you profitable.  This includes:  inventory management, feeding process evaluation, feeding technology, storage systems, forage solutions, calf & heifer management, herd audits, parlor auduits and worforce development.  Could this be your turning point?

Posted in Landmark News

Real Life Farm Summit provides real solutions on finance, human resources and safety regulations

Landmark Services Cooperative recently welcomed livestock producers and crop growers

from the Midwest to the Real Life Farm Summit in Janesville, Wis. Attendees had the opportunity to learn about financial trends, new regulations on farm equipment and finding the right employees for their farm team.

“Our goal is to provide the resources producers need to be as successful and comfortable in communicating with consumers, human resources and safety, as they are with their crops and livestock,” said Cassandra Strommen, vice president marketing development for Landmark Services Cooperative.

Dr. Jay Lehr, keynote speaker at the Real Life Farm Summit, challenged the audience to share information about their farm with consumers for two hours a month. “Twenty-four hours in a year. That is just one day,” said Lehr a science director at the Heartland Institute and author of more than 30 books and 1,000 magazine and journal articles. “A farmer’s biggest problem is that the public doesn’t understand them. Let’s change that.”

If the Real Life Farm Summit attendees accept the challenge, combined, they would be sharing about agriculture for more than 1,200 hours in 2015.

Following Lehr’s opening keynote, breakout sessions provided an in-depth look at the following key topics:

  • Do the Lambeau Leap when you look at your financial statement, presented by Hans Pflieger and Bob Panzer, Verity Business Solutions, LLC. Verity Business Solutions, LLC is the financial and consultative services arm of Landmark Services Cooperative wholly owned and powered by Landmark Services Cooperative.

Coming out of 2014, “Evaluating, reviewing and planning are critical elements to a successful 2015,” said Hans Pflieger, vice president, Verity Business Solutions. “Understanding the financial trends and break-evens of your business will help you have a better handle on your financial health.”

Pflieger shared that a reduction in working capital is a trend he has seen. “Working capital is a measure of a company’s efficiency and its short term financial health,” explained Pflieger.

  • Regulatory and safety issues on the farm, presented by Matt Solymossy, safety manager, Landmark Services Cooperative.

“State and federal safety regulation compliance continues to be front and center in 2015,” said Solymossy. “Farmers should be aware that OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) has new requirements for injury reporting in 2015.”

In addition to new injury reporting, OSHA will be working through their Local Emphasis Programs (LEPs).These programs are intended to address hazards or industries that pose a particular risk to workers in the office’s jurisdiction.

“Work with your local Landmark Services Cooperative team members to learn more about these updates, new regulations and LEPs,” said Solymossy.

Solymossy also shared updates to the new Implements of Husbandry (IoH) regulations enacted in 2015.

The Implements of Husbandry law (Wisconsin Act 377), defines and sets height, length, weight and width specifications and allows local townships to regulate and potentially require permits for both Implements of Husbandry (IoH) and Agriculture Commercial Motor Vehicles (Ag CMV). “It’s important that farmers are aware of these new regulations,” Solymossy said.

  • Finding great employees and keeping them, presented by Jeremy Henkels, executive vice president of Human Resources, Landmark Services Cooperative.

“An extraordinary amount of work goes into finding the right employee for your team,” explained Henkels. From the position description, job posting and posting the job opening to screening applicants, interviewing them and making an offer – it takes time.

“This is a challenge for every company,” said Henkel. “Once the employee is hired, then the focus should shift to keeping them engaged in positive relationships and effective communication.

Take the opportunity to listen to your employees and above all, be consistent and fair across all employees.”

Closing the Real Life Farm Summit, former Green Bay Packer Super Bowl champion and Pro Bowler, William Henderson shared his personal story of struggle and triumph, from a young boy to 12 year professional NFL player.

Henderson shared the importance of identifying goals, working toward them and surrounding oneself with a team that shares a common mindset.

“If you want something in life, it’s going to take hard work,” Henderson explained. “I appreciate everything farmers do. Every morning you get up and get it done.”

Posted in Landmark News

Real Life Farm Summit provides real solutions on finance, human resources and safety regulations

Landmark Services Cooperative recently welcomed livestock producers and crop growers

from the Midwest to the Real Life Farm Summit in Janesville, Wis. Attendees had the opportunity to learn about financial trends, new regulations on farm equipment and finding the right employees for their farm team.

“Our goal is to provide the resources producers need to be as successful and comfortable in communicating with consumers, human resources and safety, as they are with their crops and livestock,” said Cassandra Strommen, vice president marketing development for Landmark Services Cooperative.

Dr. Jay Lehr, keynote speaker at the Real Life Farm Summit, challenged the audience to share information about their farm with consumers for two hours a month. “Twenty-four hours in a year. That is just one day,” said Lehr a science director at the Heartland Institute and author of more than 30 books and 1,000 magazine and journal articles. “A farmer’s biggest problem is that the public doesn’t understand them. Let’s change that.”

If the Real Life Farm Summit attendees accept the challenge, combined, they would be sharing about agriculture for more than 1,200 hours in 2015.

Following Lehr’s opening keynote, breakout sessions provided an in-depth look at the following key topics:

 

  • Do the Lambeau Leap when you look at your financial statement, presented by Hans Pflieger and Bob Panzer, Verity Business Solutions, LLC. Verity Business Solutions, LLC is the financial and consultative services arm of Landmark Services Cooperative wholly owned and powered by Landmark Services Cooperative.

 

Coming out of 2014, “Evaluating, reviewing and planning are critical elements to a successful 2015,” said Hans Pflieger, vice president, Verity Business Solutions. “Understanding the financial trends and break-evens of your business will help you have a better handle on your financial health.”

Pflieger shared that a reduction in working capital is a trend he has seen. “Working capital is a measure of a company’s efficiency and its short term financial health,” explained Pflieger.

 

  • Regulatory and safety issues on the farm, presented by Matt Solymossy, safety manager, Landmark Services Cooperative.  “State and federal safety regulation compliance continues to be front and center in 2015,” said Solymossy. “Farmers should be aware that OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) has new requirements for injury reporting in 2015.”

 

In addition to new injury reporting, OSHA will be working through their Local Emphasis Programs (LEPs). These programs are intended to address hazards or industries that pose a particular risk to workers in the office’s jurisdiction.

“Work with your local Landmark Services Cooperative team members to learn more about these updates, new regulations and LEPs,” said Solymossy.

Solymossy also shared updates to the new Implements of Husbandry (IoH) regulations enacted in 2015.

The Implements of Husbandry law (Wisconsin Act 377), defines and sets height, length, weight and width specifications and allows local townships to regulate and potentially require permits for both Implements of Husbandry (IoH) and Agriculture Commercial Motor Vehicles (Ag CMV). “It’s important that farmers are aware of these new regulations,” Solymossy said.

 

  • Finding great employees and keeping them, presented by Jeremy Henkels, executive vice president of Human Resources, Landmark Services Cooperative.  “An extraordinary amount of work goes into finding the right employee for your team,” explained Henkels. From the position description, job posting and posting the job opening to screening applicants, interviewing them and making an offer – it takes time.

 

“This is a challenge for every company,” said Henkel. “Once the employee is hired, then the focus should shift to keeping them engaged in positive relationships and effective communication.

Take the opportunity to listen to your employees and above all, be consistent and fair across all employees.”

Closing the Real Life Farm Summit, former Green Bay Packer Super Bowl champion and Pro Bowler, William Henderson shared his personal story of struggle and triumph, from a young boy to 12 year professional NFL player.

Henderson shared the importance of identifying goals, working toward them and surrounding oneself with a team that shares a common mindset.

“If you want something in life, it’s going to take hard work,” Henderson explained. “I appreciate everything farmers do. Every morning you get up and get it done.”

Posted in Landmark News

Local man receives a year of free fuel

Jay Hrdlicka is all about helping young adults in Evansville, Wis., be the best they can be. Whether it’s football, baseball, weight training, conditioning or fundraising, Hrdlicka is there for the kids. This sports enthusiast and Landmark Evansville c-store customer was selected to receive free fuel from Tanks of Thanks®, a program that rewards people who do good deeds for others in their communities.

Hrdlicka was nominated for the Tanks of Thanks program by Evansville High School football coach Ron Grovesteen for his dedication to developing and mentoring young athletes. In the nomination, the coach praised Hrdlicka for the immeasurable hours he spends working with the community’s youth all year round.

“It’s amazing to see what a little patience, time and encouragement can do to boost young athletes’ confidence and skill,” says Hrdlicka.

As a thank you for his community involvement, Hrdlicka will receive 12 months worth of free fuel to help continue his efforts. The reward will be provided in Tanks of Thanks gift cards (valued at more than $2,000), and a case of Maxtron® PCMO 5W-30 engine oil.

CHS and Landmark have been so inspired by the many stories told through the Tanks of Thanks program. Landmark executive vice president of energy and retail services, Adam DeLawyer, notes, “We are excited to partner with CHS on this rewarding program. We take great pride in giving back to the communities we serve, and the Tanks of Thanks program is one example of doing just that.”

“We realize that the Tanks of Thanks program does more than give away free fuel. It empowers people. People like Jay Hrdlicka and the countless others who do good things for those around them. Congratulations to Jay, and thank you for your contributions to the community,” explains Akhtar Hussain, CHS refined fuels brand marketing manager.

According to Hussain, this special one-time giveaway is in addition to the $50 Cenex gas cards given to 100 recipients every month through Tanks of Thanks. The program encourages people to nominate friends, family and neighbors for free fuel as a way to say thank you for doing good in the community. “Nominating someone for Tanks of Thanks is easy, and anyone can nominate or be nominated for any act of kindness — big or small,” he says.

Posted in Landmark News

Navigating Wisconsin’s Implements of Husbandry Law

or face fines.

Implemented in 2015, the Implements of Husbandry law (Wisconsin Act 377), defines and sets height and weight specifications and allows local townships to regulate and potentially require permits for both Implements of Husbandry (IoH) and Agriculture Commercial Motor Vehicles (Ag CMV)

Matt Solymossy, safety manager for Landmark Services Cooperative, says, “The purpose of this legislation is to find balance for agriculture’s needs and local government’s responsibility for road maintenance.”

He further explains, “An IoH is a self-propelled or towed vehicle designed for, and used exclusively for, agricultural purposes. An Ag CMV is a vehicle designed and manufactured for highway use that has been adapted and now used for agricultural operations.” IoH incudes tractors; self-propelled implements such as combines, forage harvesters and fertilizer or pesticide application equipment; and towed implements such as wagons, trailers and cultivating equipment. Ag CMVs, unless manufactured prior to 1970, must meet federal motor vehicle safety standards.

 

Do I need a permit?

Local governmental entities can set their own rules according to Act 377. They can require all agricultural vehicles to abide by state code, specify certain roadways that allow overweight loads or set a higher weight limit throughout their jurisdiction. County or city ordinances and resolutions must be valid for at least one year so as to not change the rules in mid-stream.

Depending on local action, any IoH exceeding allowable size may be required to obtain a No Fee Agricultural Vehicle Permit. The Wisconsin Department of Transportation provides an online application.

As of January 1, the original grace period has ended, and operators can be cited for size and weight violations if they do not have the exemption permit. Solymossy says farmers should apply early in the year for permits that are vehicle and route specific. “You can amend it later if needed. And be sure to carry a time-stamped copy of your application until the permit is officially granted.

“You will need gross motor vehicle weight, maximum axle weight in operation mode and axle measurements,” adds Solymossy. “We at Landmark Services Cooperative can help equipment owners navigate that application process, as well as the network of local ordinances.”

 

Height, weight and length restrictions

There is no height limitation on IoH in the new rules, which clearly state the driver is responsible for safe overhead clearance. Ag CMVs are restricted to 13’6”.

There are length restrictions, with specifics for single, two- and three-vehicle combinations spelled out in the code.

Weight restrictions are affected by the number of axels and axel spacing. “In general, there is a 15 percent increase in allowable weight,” says Solymossy. “That’s 92,000 pounds Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW) or 23,000 pounds per axel.” He further explains special or seasonal provisions can affect the limits.

Potato harvesters are exempt from axle weight limits, but not GVW; and tillage, planting and harvesting equipment is clear for “incidental movements” between farm and fields that are less than one-half mile away. The restrictions do not apply to vehicles in transport to an implement dealer for delivery or repair within a 75-mile radius.

 

More to Come

The realities of Act 377 will continue to evolve through the coming year. New lighting and marking requirements go into effect November 1.

Lighting specifications outlined in the code apply to IoH manufactured prior to January 1, 2014. Implements manufactured after that date must be equipped with all original lighting and marking devices – in good working order and visible at all times of operation.

“This is about safety on Wisconsin’s roadways,” says Solymossy, “and that’s part of Landmark Services Cooperative’s mission to support the customers and communities we serve.”

To learn more about Act 377 and Landmark Services Cooperative’s Safety programs, contact Matt Solymossy at 1-800-236-3276, email: Matt.Solymossy@landmark.coop or visit www.landmark.coop.

Posted in Landmark News